[PixieoftheOaks]

Don’t mind the 3am ramblings. I’m zoned out and exhausted but not at my breaking point yet so I’m extremely bored and out of it.

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florabon:

Billy, what were you thinking?!

I’m not really taking requests at the moment (So please do not expect anything for a while if you send them), but I wanted to draw Billy, so here’s this one for now! :D


25 things i wish i realized while i was still in highschool

  1. That zit on your cheek literally does not matter
  2. Skipping class one time will not ruin your entire life
  3. The boy you’re trying so hard to impress will mean nothing to you in a year
  4. Bring coffee to school and ignore people who make fun of it
  5. Bring a snack, too. Don’t care if people hear you eating in class.
  6. Being popular isn’t and will never be something that seriously defines who you are
  7. Appreciate your teachers
  8. Doing/not doing drugs doesn’t make you cooler than anyone else.
  9. Neither does drinking
  10. Talk to the kid sitting alone; even though it may not change your life it could drastically change theirs
  11. Participate in school events
  12. Wear sweatpants everyday
  13. Or wear a dress everyday
  14. Wear whatever makes you comfortable
  15. Nobody will laugh at you if you sit alone at your lunch table for five minutes
  16. Utilize the library
  17. Don’t wait 20 minutes to text someone back just to seem cool
  18. Tell your friends how much you love them
  19. Cherish your free textbooks… seriously
  20. Help confused freshmen, be nice to them. Remember how much you would have appreciated it a couple years ago
  21. Compliment the other girls in the bathroom
  22. That fight you had with your mom really isn’t that big of a deal
  23. It’s okay to cry
  24. Don’t let your desire for a romantic relationship stop you from forming platonic relationships
  25. Remember that life does go on

(via tomlinbooties)


socialjusticekoolaid:

Protesters from across St Louis turned up and turned out for the first St Louis County Council Meeting since Mike Brown’s Death. (Part IV)

And now for the side show… the STL County Council/police fail at being empathetic, and tone deaf white people are tone deaf (and white). #staywoke #farfromover


http://madredhattie.tumblr.com/post/97760284861/im-actually-starting-to-wonder-if-the-republican →

madredhattie:

I’m actually starting to wonder if the Republican party is doing everything it can in its power to make the Obama presidency appear as a miserable failure, by blocking everything, shutting down the government, and generally fucking over the country, because we always remember governments in terms…

They’ve outright stated this. Only the ignorant think the president has any power. He’s a figurehead.


Best Thing to Do in Foreign Policy is Nothing →

laliberty:

The heartbreaking violence in the Middle East, Ukraine, and elsewhere carries many messages, but here’s one Americans shouldn’t miss: The United States — no matter who the president is — cannot manage world conflict. The corollary is that when a president tries to manage it, things will usually get worse. Foresight is always defective, and tragic unintended consequences will prevail.

The foreign-policy “experts” in both major political parties, and the intelligentsia generally, think otherwise. No matter who holds power, we can expect the opposition to complain that the chief executive poorly anticipated and thus improperly responded to world events.

If this charge weren’t so ominous, it would be comical to hear Republicans berating Barack Obama for failing to be “proactive,” for repeatedly being caught by surprise, and for not exerting “American leadership” to keep the world’s hot spots under control and, most important, in harmony with “American interests.”

But contrary to what Republicans say (or what Democrats would say if a Republican were in power), the fault lies not in the president — at least not this fault — but in the mission itself: anticipating change and managing world conflict. No president can do that competently. Why not? Because the task is not doable, and danger lies in thinking it is. Moreover, the delusion that it is doable almost always makes situations worse than they otherwise would be — weapons proliferate, violence spreads, noncombatant casualties multiply — and all this creates enemies for the American people.

Who thinks that’s a good thing? I doubt the American people would if they understood what their so-called leaders — misleaders and misrepresentatives are better terms — are doing to them, not to mention what the “leaders” are doing to the hapless subject populations abroad that suffer because of U.S.-supported machinations.

The world is complex. Specifically, individual societies are infinitely complex, historically, politically, and culturally, and thus beyond the full comprehension of any person or group. Even societies ruled and ostensibly planned by dictators have informal, hidden, and spontaneous aspects that no one can fully grasp, especially outsiders. Written laws are often irrelevant to the unwritten rules and customs actually governing a society. And each society consists of many moving parts (religious, ethnic, etc.).

Anyone who still thinks a U.S. president with expert advisers can determine the opportune moment to send armed forces into a country to effect regime change — or to arm a presumed moderate opposition — and have everything come out as planned fails to grasp this and hasn’t been paying attention for the last dozen years. The same goes for anyone who still believes America’s latest brain trust can smoothly dictate political events in another country, say Ukraine, from behind the scenes with money funneled through innocent-sounding organizations like the National Endowment for Democracy.

The problem with these grand plans is that there are human beings on the other end — people who have their own preferences about what should take place and who are likely to resent foreign or foreign-backed interference. Another stumbling block to presidential world-building is that historical regional powers — say, Russia or Iran — don’t look kindly on the United States asserting its will in their neighborhoods, just as American presidents have not welcomed foreign influence in Latin America. To many people in the world, American exceptionalism means that the United States alone gets to regard every region as within its sphere of influence. Responses to American arrogance produce many of the “crises” that the chief executive will be accused of having failed to anticipate and preempt. But no one can hope to manage the world.

The basic failure is the intervention itself. There will be crises enough without a U.S. president helping to create them.

Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria, Libya, Palestine/Israel, Ukraine and so many more in the past are all variations on a theme. Ignorant intervention begets bad consequences — unintended or not — perhaps not for American politicians or those who peddle war materiel, but certainly for those who bear the brunt in the target countries and the Americans who kill, die, and pay the economic cost.

Managing world conflict is beyond the power of any mortal. Don’t demand that a president do it.

American exceptionalism is American hubris.


There is a tendency to judge the actions of those with the least amount of power the same as those with more power and then ask, “Isn’t that what equality means?” It’s a clever rhetorical evasion of the issue. Equality is the goal, but to pretend that we actually exist as equals right now is to ignore reality. Like it or not, we all carry history with us in our personal interactions.

Mychal Denzel Smith.  Smith’s comments are being made in the context of domestic violence, but I think this quote has a universal quality to it that applies to many other contexts as well, political, personal, and otherwise. (via letterstomycountry)


sagansense:

We are driven by a sense of urgency. There is a widespread acknowledgment that the current system is not working, but also recognition that change is both necessary and achievable. We are convinced that the 2016 United Nations General Assembly Special Session (UNGASS) is an historic opportunity to discuss the shortcomings of the drug control regime, identify workable alternatives and align the debate with ongoing debates on the post-2015 development agenda and human rights.
— Fernando Henrique Cardoso; Former President of Brazil (1994-2002)

Momentum for reform is building. The 40-year outdated drug policies regarding effective treatment, availability, governance, and overall legalization have been inefficient, costly, and held our global society captive for long enough.

What is UNGASS 2016?

In short, the drug policies current in place are an utter and absolute failure. A half a century of exacerbated death, violence, crime, and blatant racism in the name of capitalism and greed have caused nothing but strife to millions.

Members of the Global Commission on Drug Policy (from left): Branson, Annan, Zedillo, Cardoso, Gaviria, Dreifuss, Kazatchkine, Sampaio and Stoltenberg

Read the Executive Summary to learn more about the recommendations being put forward, pathways to reform, and the prominent individuals on the committee with whom are leading this forward motion.

For the children: In a fairytale setting, the movie 'The War On Drugo' explains the disastrous war on drugs by telling the story of a dragon banished from an ancient kingdom, and how people that spent time with the dragon were thrown in jail.

Related Press:
HuffPost | IRIN News | Benzinga | ABC News | DrugPolicy.Org